Articles Posted in Brain Injury

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https://www.georgiabraininjurylawyersblog.com/files/2018/05/31lrSUS3NAL._AC_US436_QL65_-150x150.jpgSeveral years ago, we posted about an Atlanta couple who suffered fatal carbon monoxide poisoning after unknowingly leaving their car ignition on due to a keyless ignition. Their vehicle was a Toyota. Their adult children filed a wrongful death action after their deaths. This is only one of many such deaths and injuries caused by keyless cars. Many are aware that keyless vehicles can make it difficult for drivers to know when the vehicle ignition is off before they close the garage door and enter their homes. A keyless fob makes it possible to walk away from a running vehicle that spews dangerous toxic fumes.

The New York Times has recently published a lengthy piece about this potentially tragic convenience. As many readers know, keyless ignitions are more and more common. Carrying around a fob, rather than a key that turns the vehicle ignition on and off seems like a great improvement since turning a knob or pushing a button is all the driver needs to do to start or stop the ignition. Many newer vehicles in America are keyless. This combined with engines that are much less noisy can be a deadly, particular with older users.

When the ignition remains on in an enclosed garage, the carbon monoxide build up in a garage attached to home can become lethal and has caused death and injury. Carbon monoxide can cause serious brain damage. Carbon monoxide has no color or odor. The gas deprives vital organs, including the brain, of oxygen. Carbon monoxide poisoning may not be fatal if the victims are found early, prior to losing consciousness. But even if a person is saved from this, brain damage can result and cause victims to require lifelong care and support.

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Motor Vehicle Accidents and TBI

As noted in our prior post, falls are the most common cause of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The other major causes of TBI are motor vehicle crashes and sports injuries. In this post, we take a look at the TBI’s that often occur in vehicle crashes. Although many motor vehicles, particularly passenger vehicles, have more safety features than ever before, passenger cars, motorcycles, bicycles, trucks and buses traverse our roads together and when they collide, very serious crash injuries can occur, including brain injuries. Even in pedestrian accidents which are on the rise, brain injury can occur. Despite air bags, collision warning systems and other advancements in vehicle technologies, serious and fatal accidents continue to be a major health problem in our country.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) have published studies involving the impact of all causes, including motor vehicle crashes, in which TBI has become the  so-called “silent epidemic.” The CDC has estimated that about 1.7 million TBI’s occur annually. Over 50,000 of these injuries are ultimately fatal. A more chilling statistic is that across the population, motor vehicle crashes are the second leading cause of TBI about 18 percent, but the highest percentage of TBI fatalities over 30%. The overall cost of these injuries is estimated to be about $60 billion.

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In our dedication to staying informed about the latest developments in traumatic brain injury recovery, we recently came across a chilling story. Nearly three million people suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in our country. Some of these injuries are caused by things like auto crashes and other accidents. Sometimes these injuries are due to the negligence of others. There are many health care and research institutions around the country that are dedicated to this area of medicine. Here in Atlanta, we are fortunate to have the Shepherd’s Center which treats patients who have suffered brain injury.

After a TBI, victims need specialized care. Having a medical team with depth of knowledge and understanding of the latest developments can make a big difference in the prognosis for the injured person.
If one can imagine suffering a complex injury in a city with the support that is needed, this would be the story of injury and support.

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Welcome to Scholle Law’s Georgia brain injury blog. We launched this blog to provide medical and law-related information about brain injuries in adults and children. Our mission with this blog, as with our Atlanta Injury blog, is to inform our readers about new developments and treatments for brain injuries; help those injured in an accident caused by another person or entity to learn how and where they can get medical and legal guidance; and, provide information that is relevant and useful to all.

This is an area of particular concern for us as personal injury lawyers. Brain injuries often involve long term care for the victim. If a person who has suffered a brain injury does not get help early, this can result in a worsened long term horizon for the injured person. We hope to help our readers learn about these injuries, which range from mild to severe, so that the right help is sought early for the best outcomes.

In the past, we have touched on this area of the law and medicine. We have written about mild traumatic brain injuries that can be suffered after an auto accident or sports injury. These injuries can be overlooked since their symptoms might seem to be something else, like chronic headache or memory loss. But often these symptoms, which are not recognized as brain injury, are in fact just that. We have also written about the new research that is bringing hope to many who have suffered injuries and need continuing support. This is an exciting area, because research is moving quickly in this field. It is also very important because these injuries can be so significant and life-changing that research resulting in new treatment methods can make an enormous difference in the lives of so many.

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1214589454Q2B5aO.jpgIt makes sense that when we get on a bicycle or motorcycle, a helmet can keep us from serious brain injury. But many riders still resist the use of helmets even though they keep riders safer. Helmet use has not risen, but bike riding has. Perhaps riders don’t like to use a helmet because they assume that they cannot be seriously injured in the event of an accident or they believe that a helmet hinders their ability to see. But in our experience over two decades as Gwinnett County brain injury lawyers and bicycle accident lawyers, serious injury can often be avoided with the use of a helmet.

In some cities and states, bicycle helmets are required for all riders. In Georgia, our laws are a little different. We have several laws that provide for protective gear while riding a bicycle. Georgia’s bicycle helmet law found in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA) section 40-6-296 (d) (1)) focuses on children and teens and states that “[n]o person under the age of 16 years shall operate or be a passenger on a bicycle on a highway, bicycle path, bicycle lane, or sidewalk under the jurisdiction or control of this state or any local political subdivision thereof without wearing a bicycle helmet.” Helmets are also required to meet or exceed the standards for bicycle helmets set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or the Snell Memorial Foundation.

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